Complete Landscape Architecture
Design Glossary | G-K

landscape architecture design glossary

Use this landscape architecture design glossary to find what you need.

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G

Garden Designer: A garden designer focuses on the design of small gardens and outdoor living areas. Garden designers may also be well versed in the art of historic conservation of gardens.

Glade: Surrounded completely by woods, glades are open, grassy areas.

Gothic: Most prevalent during the twelfth through the sixteenth centuries, Gothic is a style of ornamental architecture that was considered to be old fashioned and passé by as soon as the seventeenth century. Gothic architecture is characterized by ornate, often grotesque decoration and usually includes flying buttresses, pointed arches, and ribbed vaulting.

Grade: Grade refers to the way a plot of land slopes.

Grading: Grading is the mechanical process of moving soil and earth in order to change the degree or rise of the land in order to create better drainage. Grading may also be done for other purposes such as improving a landscape’s appearance or for creating more suitable conditions.

Grand Style: Grand Style is a style of painting first introduced by English painter Sir Joshua Reynolds, the founding president of the Royal Academy. Grand Style depicts both the figures and the background in formal, idealized ways to convey the artist’s thoughts and message.

Greenbelt: Greenbelts are strips of either agricultural or outlying areas of land that are unspoiled, usually treed, and used to separate or encircle urban areas.

Green Roof Designer: Green roof designers specialize in the practice of designing elaborate roof gardens for the purpose of either storm water management, sustainable architecture, evapo-transpirative cooling, habitat creation, or merely for aesthetic purposes.

Green Wall: A green wall may either be freestanding or a part of a structure that is either completely or partially covered with some type of vegetation which may be grown with soil or some kind of inorganic growing medium. There are two types of green walls, green facades, which are made from climbing plants such as vines that grow directly on the wall, or living walls that are comprised of components like modular panels, plastic containers, an irrigation system, the growing medium, and of course, the vegetation.

Grotto: Grottos are intricately decorated underground passages that contain running rills and pools of water that combine together to create a mysterious effect. A grotto is usually adorned with pieces of stone, broken shells and mirrors.

Ground Water: Ground water is the accumulation of rain and melted snow in porous rocks located within the earth.

Guglio: A guglio, a tapered square or rectangular column of stone topped with a pyramid, often acts as a fountain and is obelisk in shape.

Gutter: Also commonly called downspouts, rain-spouts, troughs, and spouts, gutters are installed under a roof’s eaves for the purpose of draining rainwater.

H

Ha-ha: Constructed to create barriers for wildlife such as deer, sheep, and cattle, a ha-ha is a sunken fence used to keep animals at bay while still allowing for an uninterrupted view of the landscape ahead. A ha-ha is actually a ditch built into a retaining wall that is vertical on one side but slopes on the other.

Hardscape: Hardscape refers to design elements that are added to the natural resources being used and include paving, gravel, stones, retaining walls, irrigation systems, driveways and walkways, as well as fountains and other water features.

Herm: Set upon square, stone pillars, a herm is a small statue of the head of the Greek god Hermes.

Hermitage: In landscape architecture, a hermitage is a small, rustic garden building, suitable living quarters for a hermit, that is used as a place to contemplate the beauty of the surrounding nature.

Heroic Painting: Heroic painting is the art of painting in the Grand Style that depicts scenes from the scriptures or from mythology or history that strongly convey heroic qualities such as courage, generosity, honesty, justice, and loyalty.

Historic Preservation: Historic preservation is a specialty of landscape architecture that has evolved over time to include the maintenance of a site in either its current condition or the preservation of a site’s original, historic appearance. Or, the term may also refer to the conservation of a smaller site that’s a part of a larger project.

Housing and Urban Development (HUD): HUD is a federal agency who is responsible for the production and management of numerous federally funded public service programs that deal with both housing spaces and public sites.

I

International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA): An organization of professional landscape architects from several countries whose primary purpose is promoting the art of landscape planning and design.

K

Knot: Developed during Tudor times in old England consisting of intricate, geometric patterns or knots of small plants such as rosemary, a knot is laid out in such a way that it resembles certain objects, usually heraldic beasts.

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